Cape Town, Thabazimbi, Lesotho, Coffe bay and Back

Tell us about your recent trip. Please add some photographs.
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4x4 Junkie
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Wed Jan 11, 2012 4:22 pm

***UPDATED***


This was certainly the longest road trip my wife and I have done to date. We departed from Worcester on the 19th of December 2011 and arrived in Thabazimbi that same evening. Our visit to the beautiful bushveld was followed by a tour through Lesotho and driving back to Cape Town via Coffee Bay. Here are some highlights;

During our stay in Thabazimbi we made as much of our time as we could and spent it with family, but we also got to spend some time in Marakele National Park. The park is truly amazing this time of year and despite earlier predictions of very few game to be seen due to the dense vegetation this time of year, we have seen the most game that I have ever seen on one single game drive. We even manged to tick off three out of five of the Big Five. The facilities in Marakele are also very comfortable offering a picnic area for day visitors and lovely tented accommodation for overnight stays. If I could do it again, I would definitely stay over and do an evening game drive. The game is tame and one is able to get really close for some nice photos. The route through the park stretches over two sections; one section covers a camp that only houses antelope and it is within this camp that one can get out to stretch the legs or have a lovely bushveld picnic. The second section of the park houses the big five and here one should rather stay within the safe confines of your car. On the drive up to the Kransberg one get the chance to feast your eyes on the absolute pristine 360 degree views of the Waterberg mountain range. The route takes you right up to the peak of the Kransberg. Beware of the single lane road to the top though, it can become quite interesting when you're met by another traveler in the opposite direction. The spilled cup of coffee all over my wife's white t-shirt was evidence of quite a technical pull-away after trying to squeeze past the oncoming traffic.
Attachments
Marakele5.JPG
Marakele2.JPG
Marakele1.JPG
Marakele4.JPG
Last edited by 4x4 Junkie on Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:06 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Wed Jan 11, 2012 4:49 pm

So far so good!

Loking forward to the rest :cool: :thumbup:

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Thu Jan 12, 2012 12:43 pm

Destination Lesotho - Katse Dam

Onwards and forward and we're off to the Kingdom In The Sky. The route we planned was via Johannesburg and the N3 through Bethlehem and Clarens. We stopped for a short while in Clarens to see what all the hype is about and ended up purchasing a new art piece - very impulsively. It will arrive in Cape Town via courier next week :yahoo:

From Clarens we headed for Fouriesburg where we quickly filled up with diesel and made sure the wallet got the necessary contents for the road ahead. Thank goodness we decided to do a little bit of shopping in Bethlehem, because Fouriesburg is a serious one horse town, don't expect much more than an FNB ATM, filling station and a Pub.

The Caledonspoort border post is well organised and we found our very first border crossing pretty trouble free - well so we thought. We got our passports stamped at the SA immigration desk and declared one or two valuables at customs and off we went. As we arrived at Lesotho border post we were asked for our till slips - to which we obliged and were asked if we got our passports stamped. Not realising that we needed a second stamp, we nodded yes and off we were through the border and Butha-Buthe is our next destination.

Butha-Buthe is your typical township type town with General Dearlers, Liquor Off-Site Sales and many roadside stalls selling just about anything. We even spotted a KFC on our way through. I made good use of the Off-Site Sales and quickly stocked up on some Maluti Beers - which I must say, I was pleasantly surprised with. It's crisp and tastes like something between Black Label and Lion Lager ... very nice.

We saw a road sign indicating Katse Dam 122km and with the digiclock ticking just past 15:00 I estimated the remaining three and a half hours before sunset to be sufficient time for us to reach Katse before then. Well ... this was a serious underestimation.

The road to Katse - although packed with hairpins, steep ascents and descents - is tar all the way and pretty well maintained. We encountered very few potholes.The scenery was breathtaking. The mountains were nice and green and little water streams greeted us around every second corner. It was only until a road sign "Keep In Low Gear on all ascents and descents, failing brakes have killed" gave us some sort of indication of what we were really in for. The mountain passes in the Northeastern parts of Lesotho is indescribable. Hairpin bends that make you pray that no heavy vehicle will approach from the opposite direction, because there just isn't enough turning space for both of us. Climbs that do not allow you to engage second gear. It became uncommon to climb from 1900m ASL to 3000m ASL and back down to 1900ASL within only a few kilometers. I couldn't help thanking my lucky stars that we decided to do our first Lesotho trip in summer and not in winter when these passes poses an extra challenge - snow.
Lesotho Moutian Passes.JPG
Even though we had a bit of a rude awakening in terms of the road to Katse we arrived at the Katse Dam information center at 20:00. The night watch guard checked us in and we headed for the Katse Dam campsite. Although the campsite is nothing to write home about (I suppose you can't expect much more for only R20.00 per night), the stands are level and the ablutions offered a very welcome warm shower. Pitching camp in the dark didn't come without its own interesting little snags; the extension cord for the LED light somehow pulled out where I joined it, so when I plugged it into the lighter socket, one of the fuses blew and we had no LED. Luckily a drove my whole toolbox with, so fixing it took only a few minutes ... and there was light.

Being from Cape Town and living close the beach, I cannot say that I missed the sound of the ocean that night. The roaring sound of the water provided a very familiar lullaby. I must admit if there is one thing that I do enjoy about arriving at an unfamiliar destination at night; is has to be the element of surprise the next morning, breathing in the fresh air air as you are stretching out those muscles just after stepping out the tent, followed by a goods cup of coffee ... man like life is a song. In this case the campsite overlook the Katse dam wall in all its glory and with a sunrise at 3125m ASL, makes for a sheer feast for the eyes, to the first time visitor.
Kaste Campsite View.JPG

At 09:00 we joined a few people for the, very interesting, dam tour. Before and after pictures almost leaves one in disbelief that where the dam wall is now built, was once a very humble little mountain river with only enough water to provide life to the villages downstream. Today this dam provides water to the entire Gauteng and ensured Lesotho's total independence of ESKOM and now generates electricity for its people across the country - an engineering marvel. The double arch dam wall is 60m thick at its base and 9m thick at the crest with a total height of 185m and 710m in length - also at the crest. Although no photos are allowed to be taken inside the dam wall, it was quite eery to think of the masses of water just on the other side of that wall. I found this tour to be very well presented and extremely interesting. Most importantly, as one enters the main foyer of the information center, there is an information board on the wall with technical detail of the wall and the construction process. It is on this same wall, in the top right hand corner, where our legend got its place on the wall of fame - "The Toyota Hilux, the most reliable workhorse ever" with a photo of an SFA 2200 single cab 4x4.
Katse Dam Wall.JPG
Attachments
Katse Dam 1.JPG
Lesotho in sight.JPG
Katse Bridge.JPG
Last edited by 4x4 Junkie on Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:31 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Thu Jan 12, 2012 2:19 pm

Katse Dam to Ramabantha Trading Post

After our very informative tour of the dam, we were on the road again, destination - Ramabantha Trading Post. We decided on the route via Thaba-Tseka and Maseru and then heading into the Maluti mountains again towards Ramabantha. Out of our entire tour of Lesotho, this leg was the worst.

We took a gravel road from Katse to Thaba-Tseka. It is only 60km, but this 60km took us four hours. I will add that we decided to stop and help a stranded dude who's Toyota Corolla decided to give the ghost in the smeltering heat of the Lesotho highlands, so the last 10km we added an hour to our journey. Still ... if we hadn't towed the poor guy, it would still have taken us 3 hours to travel 60km. The road was so bad that even though I deflated the tyres to 1.5bar and only traveled at a maximum speed of 40km/h the left front indicator of my Lux rattled loose and later broke off, despite having fixed it temporarily with a zip tie.

The road from Thaba-Tseka towards Maseru was not much better. This road could best be describe as potholes with some tar in between. There is also major roadworks undergoing on this stretch and due to the extremely course stone that provides the road surface, I lost my left rear tyre. We quickly changed the tyre and within a few minutes we were on our way again. The amazing thing about this tyre change exercise was that, when we stopped, there was nobody within sight, but within seconds of us pulling over we had a crowed of Basothos just sitting on nearby rocks or standing as if watching a rugby match. This was probably the most excitement that they have seen in days.

After examining the map at our arrival in Roma, we realised that it wasn't necessary to travel all the way to Maseru and then back to Ramabantha, there was a road direct from Roma to Ramabantha. The Off-Site Sales in Roma provided the necessary stocks and before you could say "sandstone", we were at the Ramabantha Trading Post. We arrived just before sunset and the host at Ramabantha Trading Post, Danie, was and absolute gentlemen. Even organised some local ladies to wash a few items of clothing for us. Thinking that with the fact that we have arrived during day light, setting up camp will be much easier so we started unpacking ... well a surprise awaits. Besides that fact that we have to try repair a tyre, we discovered that something punctured two beer cans and our cloths was now soaked in beer. Luckily Danie came to our rescue. A little while later when we pumped the inflatable mattress, it made a dreadful hissing noise. Luckily the patch kit was still in the bag and we could repair it quite easily. The instruction booklet mentioned a settling time of 24hrs, but we left it for an hour and thankfully it held up.

The facilities at Ramabantha are fantastic and one could easily make the mistake of thinking you're back in SA. There are separate ladies an gents ablutions with hot showers and flush toilets. Some of the campsites have electricity that is available from 18:00 until 22:00 from a generator. The stands are nice and level with lovely green lawns all round. Ramabantha Trading Post also offers chalets and there is a little bar should one not wish to tap into your own stocks or didn't bother bringing your own.

We spent two nights at Ramabantha with the original plan to take a drive to Semongkong (the road to Semongkong has been repaired and now only takes an hour and a half to get there) for some fishing and to see the infamous Maletsunyane Falls, but unfortunately I wasn't prepared to continue our journey without a spare wheel and was forced to drive to Maseru instead. We were very lucky and made use of one of the many roadside stalls and managed to barter a deal on a retread tyre for only R250.00. While in Maseru, we also made use of the opportunity to quickly stock up on some much need supplies - especially meat. We were totally shocked at the prices. R 188.00 per kg for lamb chops!! After a bit a sightseeing we headed back to Ramabantha to see 2012 in.

Had a good opskop until just after midnight. The spirit in the camp was cheerful and everyone had a good time.

The following morning my wife and I took our fly rods down to the river to try our luck for some yellows or trout, but they were quite skittish and we only managed one nice yellow, which was released (unintentionally) before the photos was taken, we had a lot of fun nonetheless.

At about lunch time it was again time to break camp and head down to Malealea.
Attachments
Basotho Hut.JPG
River at Ramabantha2.JPG
River at Ramabantha.JPG
Ramabantha Trading Post Campsite2.JPG
Ramabantha Trading Post Campsite.JPG
Last edited by 4x4 Junkie on Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Thu Jan 12, 2012 2:46 pm

I love your report Julian thanks for sharing, I'm headed home also end of March - can't wait hey.
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Thu Jan 12, 2012 3:58 pm

Hey Tumelo,

Thanks, I will add the Malealea report this evening.

I didn't know that Lesotho was "home" for you. That explains your choice of wheels :thumbup: :thumbup:

I couldn't believe how many Hiluxes are driving around in Lesotho, from very old and still going strong, to the very newest models.

The one thing I must say that I noticed about Lesotho and the Basothos alike is how proud they are of their belongings and their country. Although almost every car, taxi or bakkie sounded like there was a Gremlin with a four pound hammer hanging onto the suspension (my guess is, this is mostly due to the condition of the roads), every car we saw was roadworthy and mostly neat and clean. We did not see one piece of litter lying around when traveling through the villages. Both my wife and I gained a lot of respect for people that live on the roof of Africa :D:
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Thu Jan 12, 2012 4:18 pm

Unemployement is a reality and I'm not sure if the government does enuff. Always wonder how they can afford the latest Prado's :shock2: , ya but as you say they are a simple down to earth people, generally.

Toyota rules in Africa, hence so many, CupCake got so irritated cos I kept on going about that :mocking: , even in the Eastern Cape.
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Thu Jan 12, 2012 8:13 pm

Lovely pics and great report so far Julian. :thumbup: :thumbup: Looking forward to the rest! :D: ;-)
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Fri Jan 13, 2012 9:19 am

Dit lyk nou soos n lekker trip daai!
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Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:42 pm

:clap: :clap: :clap: Yip, i love that piece of Africa, i worked on the Mohale Tunnel & Dam project and stayed there for 2 years and 9 months and enjoyed every bit of it :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Fri Jan 13, 2012 8:19 pm

Lovely report Julian, I am enjoying every little bit :thumbup:

More.... :beg: :beg: :beg:

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Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:33 pm

Sorry for keeping you hanging like this. This first couple of days back at the office has been a bit hectic.

The Last Stretch – Malealea and Coffee bay ( Via Lundean’s Nek)

Anyway … So we say goodbye to the luxuries of Ramabantha and head down to Malealea. Due to our decision to try our luck at some fly fishing, we only departed at lunchtime, but we were lucky enough to have met a group of people that did our exact route, just in the opposite direction and from their reports the road to Malealea is nothing to worry about and will take roughly two and a half hours.

Their report wasn’t far off and three hours later we checked into Malealea. The landscapes of Southeastern Lesotho are totally different to that of where we have just come from. One gets the feeling of being in typical Drakensberg area. There is no more treacherous mountain passes to cross and the potholes seem to have been filled here and there.

Malealea is a very nice camp. Similar to Ramabantha, electricity is supplied by a generator from 18:00 – 22:00. We didn’t experience the campsites to be quite as nice as Ramabantha, the boma and ablutions didn’t offer the same level of cleanliness. However, we found that they have made two, two-plate gas stoves as well as a few condiments available, which we thought was a nice touch. Besides camping, Malealea offers a range of accommodation possibilities such as Forest huts, Basotho huts and Chalets, each in a different price category.
Malealea Campsite.JPG
There is curio shop and a well-stocked bar and a small coffee shop.

The highlight of our tour through Lesotho was definitely the pony trek down to Botsoela waterfall.
We couldn’t believe how strong and surefooted these ponies were. Uphill just lean forward in your saddle and downhill lean back and these ponies will take you to and fro without any incident. We traversed the slopes down into the valley and crisscrossed the river a few times. The path then takes you uphill again to the top of the waterfall. It is here where one dismounts your four legged friend. After a short hike you’re standing at the feet of this magnificent waterfall. Don’t expect to see the Victoria Falls, it’s a very modest fall, but don’t take anything from it either, it is beautiful and the cool mountain stream offers welcome relief after the two hour trip on pony back. We packed a few eats and had ourselves a lovely picnic while sitting in the cool water. Like with anywhere in Lesotho, money is a scarce commodity amongst the rural locals. There were a couple of kids around the falls offering a guide down to the falls and at the falls itself we encountered the “Local Band” who provided entertainment. We were told by our pony guide that it is customary to show gratitude for services rendered in financial terms, but not to overdo it because they also don’t want to create a culture of begging or greed.
Pony Trek1.JPG
Pony Trek 2.JPG
Pony Trek 3.JPG
Botsoela falls 1.JPG
Botsoela falls 2.JPG
On the way back I had the chance to let my pony stretch her legs a bit and galloped about one third of the way back to the stables. Well, all I can say is WOW, not only does these ponies know how to climb these mountains, but they’ve got some speed to. I must be honest, our guide told me that my pony, Sophia, was already ten years old, so I didn’t want to push her too hard, but even at that ripe old age, she was still more than willing. The rest of day was spent in the curio shop and we enjoyed a few ice cold Maluti’s again followed by a well-deserved afternoon nap.

The following day marked the end of our stay in the Kingdom In The Sky and shortly after breakfast we were on the road again heading for Tele Bridge border post. Once again, the road was in good condition (or maybe by now we were so conditioned to dodge the potholes that it seemed normal), we travelled at an average of 80km/h, or whatever the speed limit was. On the way one passes through Mafeteng. This is the second largest town, after Maseru, that we passed through. We noticed a Shoprite and most ATM’s from banks also available in SA. Mohale’s Hoek is closer to Butha-Buthe in size and only offers the bare minimum. The very last few kilometers to Tele Bridge is a bumpy gravel road, but can be managed in a sedan, if one goes slowly.

Arriving at the border post we were overwhelmed by the idea that we are about to return to SA. Even though Lesotho is very beautiful, one quickly realizes the value of being an SA citizen, but another surprise awaits us. When we presented our passports at the immigration desk, the two female officials mumbled something in seSotho and gave both my wife and I the beady eye with an expression on their faces of “You’re in big trouble.” They then informed us that we only have one stamp in our passports instead of two. It then dawned on us that when the lady at the Lesotho side of Caledonspoort asked us if we had our passports stamped, she meant that we needed to have it stamped again at Lesotho side’s immigration desk as well, which we didn’t do. With some very friendly smiles and pleading total ignorance we managed to convince them not to send us to the SA Embassy in Maseru and they stamped our passports and we were off.

This was a very scary moment and we suddenly realized how lucky we were that our passports weren’t checked at any of the nine roadblocks where we were stopped. You can only imagine the relief when we crossed the river and finally and officially entered SA again. This also illustrated how easily a mistake like this can happen which could result in dream holiday ending up in total disaster. Please remember to have your passports stamped on both sides of the border at the immigration office/desk.

We arrived in Sterkpruit where we quickly filled up with diesel and we were left with a quick decision on planning the next stretch of our route: We are heading for Coffee Bay via Barkly East. We have one of two choices; 240km of tar road or 199km gravel road via Lundean’s pass. My wife’s words was: “Let’s take the gravel road, surely it can’t be worse than the road between Thaba-Tseka and Katse dam”, so I quickly stopped to lock the freewheel hubs, engaged 4H and off we went. The road up to Lundean’s Nek village wasn’t too bad. Up to this point we still encountered a minibus taxi every now and then. It is after Lundean’s Nek village that things started to get a little more interesting. Not too much further I decided not to labour the engine, gearbox and clutch so I engaged third gear 4L which proved to be a very comfortable driving arrangement for both the Lux and passengers, taking the terrain into account. We drove the pass and really enjoyed the scenery. The pass follows a river valley and it was interesting to think that Lesotho lies just on the other side of the river. The terrain was challenging, but I would be of the opinion that a 4x2 or SUV would be able to cross the pass without much difficulty (considering that we drove this route in summer, no rains or winter snow. I can imagine that this road can turn very ugly when wet or covered in snow sludge), the option of low range just made it so much easier.

Along the way we were suddenly faced with a closed farm gate which posed a bit of a What The Frikkedel moment, but there is satellite police station there and we were soon informed that we are still on the correct road heading for Barkly East. Soon after this we crossed a small stream where we quickly stopped for some very welcome relief from the heat. A little way further a farmer offered to quickly refill our flasks with some fresh mountain water.

This is skiing territory and we drove past the turnoff towards Tiffindell Ski Resort. The rest of the road up to Barkly East went by without incident. The route from Sterkspruit to Barkly East (Via Lundeans Pass) took us just shy of six hours to complete the 199km.
Lundean's Nek Pass.JPG
Lundean's Nek Pass 2.JPG
Next stop Elliot; upon our arrival in this well organized little town, we quickly did some shopping at the local Shoprite and we were pleased not to have to pay the exorbitant prices of Lesotho any longer.

From Elliot to Coffee Bay we drove through Mthatha and were soon reminded how the taxis in SA just do what they want. We arrived in Coffee Bay just before ten o’clock that evening. There is road works underway to improve the section from the N2 down to Coffee Bay, but when travelling this route, it is still necessary to drive very carefully as this road is riddled with potholes as well.

We were very disappointed with the accommodation at Philda’s Place and checked into the Coffee Bay campsite the very next day. The campsite is awesome! Every single site is just about secluded and one camp under a continuous canopy of Milkwood trees and at only R80pppn real value for money. Clean ablutions with hot showers and if you ask nicely, the owners might even help with freezer space in the office at the gate. We took a drive down to Hole In The Wall and even got some fishing in. Coffee Bay is very pretty and definitely warrants a visit at least once. The only criticism that we had is that this is a very poor part of our country and unemployment is rife. We were offered anything from beaded necklaces and bracelets to a wide variety of illegal substances. People offer guided tours to popular fishing spots, washing clothing or dishes or just plain begging around every corner and at some point it just got a bit much. Other than that, it’s really pretty and peaceful if you are well armed against the mosquitos.

Coffee Bay Marked the end of road trip and on the 6th of January we headed back to the fairest Cape. It was a truly remarkable trip with some unexpected (some nice, some not so nice) adventures. We will certainly return to Lesotho, but this time armed with some firsthand experience to make planning the next trip so much easier.

All-in-all we drove 5231km and used 748 liters of diesel. On this trip camping was most certainly the best way to explore our country (and Lesotho) on a shoestring budget. Having your own tent with your own bed and bedding also offered familiar surrounds in an unfamiliar location. In general we found the campsites to be well equipped and comfortable.




Some Tips on Lesotho

Before we headed for Lesotho I really tried my best to find information on Lesotho, but info is spread very thinly and things like “Prepare for the unexpected” just wasn’t good enough for me. So here are some of the lessons we learned during our stay.
• Don’t plan your trip with the same speeds in mind compared to SA. Work on a maximum of 40km/h and plan your next destination accordingly.
• Some extra equipment like a puncture repair kit, an inverter and a good tyre compressor came in very handy on our trip and I will highly recommend it.
• If at all possible, take an extra spare wheel with. It could have made life a lot simpler for us anyway.
• Diesel was fairly available on the route that we took. You will find diesel in almost every “major” town. (Map Studio sells a very detailed map of Lesotho and it proved to be invaluable on our trip)
• Diesel is slightly cheaper in Lesotho than in SA
• When approaching a roadblock, stop in line with the stop sign and wait to be called.
• Always wear your seatbelt.
• Always have some canned food with you and warm clothing or blankets in case you have to overnight next to the road. This is very unlikely, but a necessary precaution.
• The border crossings are hassle free. Just remember to have your passports stamped on both sides of the border.
• There is a maximum duty free allowance to take some of your own food with you. We were unaware of this and it ended up costing us dearly. The same applies to alcohol, although you will find it very difficult to explain those three cases of Whiskey, three cases of Brandy and six cases of Castle Lager as personal consumption. So take it easy and stay within reason.
• The Basotho people believe that tourists take their pictures and sell it in their home countries for millions. It is regarded fair to expect a small compensation for photographs. Just don’t overdo it. Five or Ten Maluti or SA Rand is sufficient.
• Throwing sweets for the kids is discouraged. One of the hosts at one of campsites said jokingly; “Dentists are not really an available profession around here.”
• We didn’t encounter any stone throwing.
• We found the Basotho people to be, generally, friendly, but do not take chances. Keep your vehicle locked and valuables in a safe place.
Last edited by 4x4 Junkie on Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:48 am, edited 2 times in total.
If you still have blank pages in your passport, it's probably time for a road trip.

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Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:56 pm

A few more photies
Attachments
Lundean's Nek Pass 4.JPG
Lundean's Nek Pass 3.JPG
Coffee Bay 2.JPG
Coffee Bay 1.JPG
Basotho Cattle Herder.JPG
If you still have blank pages in your passport, it's probably time for a road trip.

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jgduvenage
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Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:18 pm

Very nice report with good tips

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Thu Jan 19, 2012 6:19 pm

Dankie Johan :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Thu Jan 19, 2012 6:23 pm

Nice :thumbup: Tx for sharing :wink2:

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Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:32 pm

Looks like you had a lovely trip Julian. Nice pics! :thumbup: ........








Now, why didn't you pop on to us East Londoners when you passed through here! :acute: :D:
When your road comes to an end ...... you need a HILUX!.

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Fri Jan 20, 2012 9:45 am

:blackeye: Hi Andy, :oops:

Originally our plans was to do a half way stop in Cape St Francis on the way back to Cape Town. Unfortunately we weren't happy with our accommodation and we checked into the campsite. We were only going to stay in Coffee Bay for two nights, but subsequently decided to add another.

This meant that we drove from Coffee Bay to Cape Town in one go. Left CB at 08:15 and arrived in CPT 00:30. I promise next time we'll plan it better and make sure to pop in, thanks for the invite :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Fri Jan 20, 2012 9:56 pm

4x4 Junkie wrote::blackeye: Hi Andy, :oops:

Originally our plans was to do a half way stop in Cape St Francis on the way back to Cape Town. Unfortunately we weren't happy with our accommodation and we checked into the campsite. We were only going to stay in Coffee Bay for two nights, but subsequently decided to add another.

This meant that we drove from Coffee Bay to Cape Town in one go. Left CB at 08:15 and arrived in CPT 00:30. I promise next time we'll plan it better and make sure to pop in, thanks for the invite :thumbup: :thumbup:
Hmmmmm...sound like half an excuse.... :mocking: :mocking: :mocking:

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Sat Jan 21, 2012 8:04 am

½ Excuse accepted! :lol:

But, ja ..... next time! ;-)
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Life is like a jar of Jalapeño peppers ... what you do today, might burn your ass tomorrow.
Don't take life too seriously ..... no-one gets out alive.
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Sat Feb 04, 2012 6:52 pm

Great trip report & pics...Thanx
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Sat Feb 04, 2012 8:01 pm

Great trip report,thanks for the tips :thumbup: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Sun Feb 05, 2012 10:45 pm

Thanks Neil, glad you found value in it :thumbup:
If you still have blank pages in your passport, it's probably time for a road trip.

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4x4 Junkie
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Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:30 pm

For those that may be interested, I see Google Earth now offers street view in Lesotho. This will help a bit when planning your next trip there.
If you still have blank pages in your passport, it's probably time for a road trip.

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