2.5td DC 4x4 Hilux (2015) or 79 4.2D LC double cab (2016)?

Here we discuss Hiluxes in general. Your view of the Hilux. For other general discussions please see "open Discussions" under the "Around the Campfire" heading.
Post Reply
Slowones
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 10:59 pm
Town: Somerset West
Vehicle: LC105 GX
Real Name: Terry

Thu May 03, 2018 10:33 pm

The First Story

My first post on the forum and it is to seek opinions (possibly advice). I asked a similar question on the other forum, but this seems to be place to get advice on hilux vehicles (Thanks for the pointers Warthog). I know very little about cars and even less about hilux's. PS Get coffee this is a long read.

The Back Story
We are wanting a vehicle for travel through Southern and Eastern Africa for a few months (12 to be sure). We are wanting to take our daughter out of school and do a trip. So that means 3 people. And that means stuff. Lots of stuff. Less is more does not seem to work with 4x4ing and overlanding. Whilst we will be remote and dont mind the road less travelled, unknown spoor tracks will be the rare occasion as opposed to the norm. But we do not want to limit ourselves to the places and things we can experience because of a vehicle (folks travelled from London in a double decker bus....).

Now in chatting to other overlanders the main thing they mention is diesel (we are wanting diesel) and also stock standard suspension. Any after market upgrades that get damaged further up north tend to be expensive as they are not stock standard. As a matter of fact, they all say keep the car as stock standard as possible so that most mechanics (bush type or not) can fix any problems.

The Problem Story

We currently own a 105 gx 4.2d, called Daisy. She runs beautifully and we totally enjoy the slow lane when we take her out. We have kitted her out and the few trips we have done she has run beautifully. The plan was to keep her for the African trip.

However, as a family of 3 we are finding that space is a real issue. By the time the fridge and all the other food stuff goes in, all the electronic gadgets (camera's, binos, tablets, laptop etc) and other odds and sods, all land up on the back seat. Then there is recovery equipment, sleeping stuff, sitting stuff, shower stuff, cooking stuff, extra fuel stuff, extra water stuff and, stuff and more stuff. There is just not enough space (or weight limits for overloading !) While we have got rather good on cutting out stuff down to minimal, things are reaching a stage where we need to spend some money on her and it is either spend the money on upgrades or look at a new vehicle. It is not that we want more space for more stuff, just an easier way to back our existing stuff Ok, I also need space for a fishing rod and a drone and a telescope and a second camera body with tripod. Is this to much to ask ?

While we were away we saw a 79 landcruiser and it looked just about perfect. And then we got reading and a double cab Hilux popped up. A trailer is very much not an option.

The Questions:
  • In terms of overland travel, how often to you really need to use the full 4x4 capabilities of the car? Yes the LC is a burely 4x4, but how often to you really need all that 4x4 "power".
  • Which offers more space the Hilux DC or the 79 DC ?
  • Which has better fuel consumption the Hilux or the LC?
  • Normally aspirated toyota's have a reputation of having parts readily available and generally can be repaired by bush mechanics. The Hilux is a turbo, what is the risk of blowing a turbo? And how tricky are they to repair in "darkest" africa? All our discussions with overlanders have been, not if it breaks down, but when. As something surely will go wrong and you want a bush mechanic to be able to fix it.
  • Would you even travel into africa with a turbo car for 12 months? So may overlanders say stay away from turbo's?
  • While we are very blessed that money is not (to much) of an issue, price (value) is a concern. The 2015 Hilux at R290K vs the 79LC at R450K one needs to be sure that there is R160K worth of value to be had for overlanding. (Oh yes, both are equally well kitted out)
  • Which has better fuel consumption? The Hilux or LC
  • What are the general running costs compared of the two vehicles?
  • Do you guys know what the carry weight difference is between the Hilux and LC? Stuff = weight. Will moving from a 105 to a double cab give us more space to pack safely ?
  • I am sure some will say upgrade the suspension of 105 we already have. While not what I want in terms of repair, the other concern would be potential for overloading. Buy the time all the "static essential equipment is included on the car, there is not much room for anything else. Think roof rack, RTT, wheel carries (x2) and two spare wheels, rear bumber, 40l water, 130l fuel, 2 full jerry cans, front bumber, front winch, recovery gear, highlift jack AND we have not started loading the "stuff" yet.
  • I drove the old (1990's) LC single cabs and the rides were not that bad, although it was in a previous life, but with a loaded 2016 79 LC, will the ride still be an uncomfortable one? Surely suspension and vehicle design have changed?
And then lastly ......
would you move from a 4.2d 105gx to a double cab ? If you had to choose, the 2015 2.5td hilux or the 2016 79 4.2d LC?

Slowones
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 10:59 pm
Town: Somerset West
Vehicle: LC105 GX
Real Name: Terry

Mon May 07, 2018 7:30 am

WOW! No replies. Ok I thought the hilux owners would be all over this.

You guys must be to busy driving ! :clap:

Hopefully during the week we will get some replies.

Slowones.

JamesC
LR 4WD Full Lockers
LR 4WD Full Lockers
Posts: 539
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 10:11 am
Town: Potchefstroom
Vehicle: SRX 2.5 4x4 D/C
Real Name: James
Location: Potchefstroom

Mon May 07, 2018 7:43 am

Terry

Interesting read...and I am sure you will soon be inundated with replies from specialists.

My 0.0001 Bitcoin's worth:

1. The Hilux has better fuel consumption.
2. The normally aspirated 4.2 Diesel is more trustworthy and can be fixed anywhere.
3. The Cruiser is used widely throughout Africa as government vehicles so spares no issue.
4. Using 4x4? I have hunted Africa from the DRC and Congo southwards and the times I have used 4x4 I can count on one hand...always had a bit of a chuckle when I saw these groups of SAFFAS coming through the border with high lift jacks and spades and the kitchen sink attached. I have never even owned a high lift jack.
5. That brings me to space: space is like a salary check...the more you earn the more you spend and it never seems to be enough. So, if you cannot effectively pack your 105, you need to rethink your gadgets. Which brings me to the 105...
6. It will cost way less to spend a few bucks on Daisy and than what it would cost to purchase either a Hilux or a 79.
James Cameron
0834431879

JohanM
Monster Truck
Monster Truck
Posts: 3894
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:33 pm
Town: Farmlands
Vehicle: Anything
Real Name: Johan
Club VHF Licence: X45
Location: Free State

Mon May 07, 2018 8:51 am

Hi Terry,

I have read about a family of 4 that once travelled through Africa in a 105 Cruiser so I think it can clearly be done. Regarding your questions, I will answer them as to how I see it.




We currently own a 105 gx 4.2d, called Daisy. She runs beautifully and we totally enjoy the slow lane when we take her out. We have kitted her out and the few trips we have done she has run beautifully. The plan was to keep her for the African trip. -


They are perfect overlander vehicles of choice due to space and load ability. A Cruiser Double cab can take about a 1200kg load in total including fuel and passengers and the load. A 105 is rated close to 1080 kg load capacity. So to spend that amount of money is not making sense for a bit more KG.

Your daughter will hate you for the lack of ride comfort in a pickup compared to the wagon and also you wife might complain about a harsher ride, thinking you are going to travel 12 months. How many broken coils springs do you read of on trans world/africa expeditions. How many broken leaf springs have you read about?

With how you load and things, I would say that You do not need 2x full size spare wheels in Africa. Save weight and carry one full size spare wheel and a additional tyre casing but leave the second rim at home. Never seen someone travel africa and bending two steel 105 Cruiser rims to the extent of destroying them. Use the second swing arm to carry maybe firewood or even the recovery gear in a lockable box. Makes for easy access at all times and takes up no space on the roof or inside. You can also attach the Hi lift jack here with the spade.

Most of the time you will not need to carry more than 60L of water for the 3 of you. That can be 3/4 days of water for all of you. Sleeping should be planned that maybe your daughter can sleep in the car on a bed made when setting up camp, and you up in a roof top tent.

Go buy the front runner expander chair, I have two of a similar one. Have seen you can fit 4x of those chairs in one High lid ammo box. They are fantastic, strong and really comfortable, bear in mind I am 1.9 tall so not any chair is comfortable for me.

Food stuff is a plenty in Africa. you only need to carry for the days you are not going to have it when crossing a remote region. So food stuff should be for a max of 7/8 nights. I would seriously consider to split the rear seat and put the fridge behind one seat and keep the 60% seat for your daughter to ensure long distance comfort. That will aid weight distribution.

Some things you might not have known about the 105 series Cruiser. You can carry up to 270L of fuel in two tanks on those vehicles.
Also they can carry 60L of water in the chassis mounted between the axles. So that quickly solves a lot of issues straight away and clears up a lot of space on the roof for lighter camping equipment and also space inside the vehicle.

Try and keep the drawers/packing system as simple and modular as possible.


The Questions:
  • In terms of overland travel, how often to you really need to use the full 4x4 capabilities of the car? Yes the LC is a burely 4x4, but how often to you really need all that 4x4 "power".
- You will be glad you have the power when encountering rough terrain or even when the weather plays a surprise ticket. So keep to 4x4 vehicle with a strong frame and low gearing.
  • Which offers more space the Hilux DC or the 79 DC ?
- Cruiser Double cab has a bigger loadbin and more upright cabin space
  • Which has better fuel consumption the Hilux or the LC?
- Hilux
  • Normally aspirated toyota's have a reputation of having parts readily available and generally can be repaired by bush mechanics. The Hilux is a turbo, what is the risk of blowing a turbo? And how tricky are they to repair in "darkest" africa? All our discussions with overlanders have been, not if it breaks down, but when. As something surely will go wrong and you want a bush mechanic to be able to fix it.
- Standard engine is best, turbo has its risks but then they sell them all over africa too with the d4d turbo engines. Should say that can do it with normal maintenance
  • Would you even travel into africa with a turbo car for 12 months? So may overlanders say stay away from turbo's?
- Aftermarket turbos yes, factory fitted turbo's is very reliable.
  • While we are very blessed that money is not (to much) of an issue, price (value) is a concern. The 2015 Hilux at R290K vs the 79LC at R450K one needs to be sure that there is R160K worth of value to be had for overlanding. (Oh yes, both are equally well kitted out)
- Re Kit and re gear your current vehicle and enjoy it. Will be far better money spent IMO.
  • What are the general running costs compared of the two vehicles?
- Not too sure but the cruiser will be more costly
  • Do you guys know what the carry weight difference is between the Hilux and LC? Stuff = weight. Will moving from a 105 to a double cab give us more space to pack safely ?
- More space and also the chance to overload more easily. More space = more stuff taken along = more Weight.
  • I am sure some will say upgrade the suspension of 105 we already have. While not what I want in terms of repair, the other concern would be potential for overloading. Buy the time all the "static essential equipment is included on the car, there is not much room for anything else. Think roof rack, RTT, wheel carries (x2) and two spare wheels, rear bumber, 40l water, 130l fuel, 2 full jerry cans, front bumber, front winch, recovery gear, highlift jack AND we have not started loading the "stuff" yet.
And then lastly ......
would you move from a 4.2d 105gx to a double cab ? If you had to choose, the 2015 2.5td hilux or the 2016 79 4.2d LC? - from a money perspective, no, a wagon is a much much more comfortable ride and overlander. Bearing in mind you have your daughter and wife with you, their ride comfort is paramount. I would personally re look at rekitting the vehicle for lighter and more agile camping setup. RTT do have a very large unspoken potential safety risk and therefore I will not buy one.

Spoke to Dave van Graan that has done a few trans africa trips. Slipping on a RTT ladder can easily result in a broken leg, ankle or even just torn ligaments or even a other serious medical problem. The dew on the metal ladder makes for a deadly combination. It only takes one slip and then it can be over for the trip. He had more than once a situation like that, which resulted in medical air evac and ruined trip. Bear in mind you are planning for 12 months, I would rather look at a awning tent with self inflating beds on a proper ground sheet in stead. No need to carry leveling blocks with to park on to level the tent on the roof. Lighter and more compact to pack and same setup time as a RTT. Remember that most wild animals (predators) can get ontop a vehicle thus no real benefit of sleeping ontop in anycase. Look at the OZ tents that set up in 30 seconds. Roomy and can easy be carried on the roof rack. Most serious off road tour operators do not have a RTT fitted and there is very good reasons for it.

I was once told that the amount of fuel and water in weight should be more or equal to the amount of food and all the kit that you take along. Thus as the vehicle travels it will become lighter at times but not be overloaded when fully loaded.

270L of diesel = 270KG.
60L of water = 60 kg

Thus your camping kit, food, fridge and clothes and electronics should not be more than 330kg.

Thus when filled up with water and fuel your loaded to 660 kg of 1080 kg (excluding the bumpers and winches).
2x adults @+/- 85 kg = 170 kg
1x Child @ 50kg

Thus the vehicle should then be loaded to 880 kg and the bumpers and winch and dual battery should make up the 200 kg which means thant it will be loaded at max GVM at times and become lighter thus it is possible to stay within the limits.

Some food for thought.

[/quote]
Johan Marais

Slowones
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 10:59 pm
Town: Somerset West
Vehicle: LC105 GX
Real Name: Terry

Mon May 07, 2018 8:51 pm

Thanks Johan

Very much some food for thought.

I guess the real issue then is the risk. Do we upgrade the suspension to be able to handle the increased weight and if something goes wrong just import a new shock, or possibly airbags but without changing the existing coil set up.

Some tough decisions ahead.

But thank you for your input.

As a "final" question, your thoughts on turbos in africa ?

Final Final question, do you have contact details for Dave van Graan through the forum ? Or is this a private contact?

Again, thank you for your input.

User avatar
pieta.swanepoel
High Range 4WD
High Range 4WD
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2017 1:21 pm
Town: Cape Town
Vehicle: Toyota Hilux SRX 2.5D-4D 4x4 SC
Real Name: Pieta

Tue May 08, 2018 5:56 am

Terry, you will be suprised how little space there is in the DC Hilux. If your 105 don't have enough space then the Hilux certainly won't have enough.
But it will be a lot cheaper to run than the Cruiser.

Maybe revisit how you pack the 105 and what you take with
Groot berge en lang grondpaaie

JohanM
Monster Truck
Monster Truck
Posts: 3894
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:33 pm
Town: Farmlands
Vehicle: Anything
Real Name: Johan
Club VHF Licence: X45
Location: Free State

Tue May 08, 2018 5:09 pm

HI Terry, Here is my replies to your questions.
Slowones wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 8:51 pm
Thanks Johan

Very much some food for thought.

I guess the real issue then is the risk. Do we upgrade the suspension to be able to handle the increased weight and if something goes wrong just import a new shock, or possibly airbags but without changing the existing coil set up. - Upgrade the suspension and try and not use airbags to carry the weight, the suspension should do that. YOU can Use the air suspension in combination with the upgraded coils to try and keep the vehicle relative level instead of to much tail down, however correct loading and choice of suspension and gear will almost eliminate this.

Some tough decisions ahead.

But thank you for your input.

As a "final" question, your thoughts on turbos in africa ? - Depens who is going to do it, aftermarket of factory fitted? That is the main give away as to what should and should not last. I would try and not turbo the vehicle if you are going to be doing 12 months unassisted touring. Andrew White had good success in turbo charging a 1HZ in the 105 Cruiser with a very low boost which made a reasonable difference. Maybe go search his youtube channel 4xforum and view the overlanders dream videos' which feature the 1hz turbo 105 cruiser.

Final Final question, do you have contact details for Dave van Graan through the forum ? Or is this a private contact? - Private contact, but you can contact his office - Massazane Expeditions. Very nice guy and he will also be able to tell you about RTT and the things about them.

Go look at all the gear to be taken and if it can only do one function then it is not suitable for travelling with.

Versatility and multiple uses is key for your trip. Have fun planning

Again, thank you for your input.
Johan Marais

User avatar
Haboob
Monster Truck
Monster Truck
Posts: 2406
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:57 pm
Town: King Williams Town
Vehicle: Hilux
Real Name: Edge
Club VHF Licence: HC129

Tue May 08, 2018 5:18 pm

The First Story

My first post on the forum and it is to seek opinions (possibly advice). I asked a similar question on the other forum, but this seems to be place to get advice on hilux vehicles (Thanks for the pointers Warthog). I know very little about cars and even less about hilux's. PS Get coffee this is a long read.

The Back Story
We are wanting a vehicle for travel through Southern and Eastern Africa for a few months (12 to be sure). We are wanting to take our daughter out of school and do a trip. So that means 3 people.
You must remember that you will also need a comprehensive medical bag, as you may be far from medical assistance when you need it most.
And that means stuff. Lots of stuff. Less is more does not seem to work with 4x4ing and overlanding. Whilst we will be remote and dont mind the road less travelled, unknown spoor tracks will be the rare occasion as opposed to the norm. But we do not want to limit ourselves to the places and things we can experience because of a vehicle (folks travelled from London in a double decker bus....).
That desion is yours to make. The double decker bus probably brought them down the main hiway, which is probably tarred from Cape to Cairo. If you want to do a little more exploring, you will need sonmething that can get you stuck a little further away from home/ or the main hiway. The best ourist/destinations, are not all situated alongside the tar road.

Now in chatting to other overlanders the main thing they mention is diesel (we are wanting diesel) and also stock standard suspension. Any after market upgrades that get damaged further up north tend to be expensive as they are not stock standard. As a matter of fact, they all say keep the car as stock standard as possible so that most mechanics (bush type or not) can fix any problems.
Load Hogg helper springs are very basic, and could be made in the bush, if you know how, and can level you ride, making it safer and much more stable. I had a set on my previous D/C Hilux and was very happy with what they did; and received no problems anywhere with them. They are helper springs for leaf springs though and not for coil springs. There are rubber spacers that can be fitted between the coil springs to firm the ride. I have read about the rubber airbags that can be pumped to different stiffnesses, for different loads of your vehicle, that can be used, but have heard about many of them failing on heavily laden vehicles, so think about your different options, before committing yourself.

The Problem Story

We currently own a 105 gx 4.2d, called Daisy. She runs beautifully and we totally enjoy the slow lane when we take her out. We have kitted her out and the few trips we have done she has run beautifully. The plan was to keep her for the African trip.
I would make sure that she is in tip top condition, and then stick to what you have, know and are happy with.

However, as a family of 3 we are finding that space is a real issue. By the time the fridge and all the other food stuff goes in, all the electronic gadgets (camera's, binos, tablets, laptop etc) and other odds and sods, all land up on the back seat.
Cut down on the extra luxuaries, ie make a choice between the laptop and the tablet (why take both?). Take smaller binoculars, travelling along the tar roads you will only see settlements and very little else. On the Hilux Forum, speak to Thunder02 Chabber Canvas Product, Neil & his missus will make you bags to fit on your dash, with pockets for binoculars, cameras, spectacles and whatever. They will make you a saddle over your gear leavers in which you can fit maps, books or whatever. This free's up space elsewhere, even if it does not lighten the load. Just make sure that these pockets are a little larger than A4 size, otherwise the fit is a little tight.
Then there is recovery equipment (Look at minumal and self help stuff), sleeping stuff (sew sheet closed like sleeping bag, which keeps sleeping bag or blankets clean, and is then also easy to wash just the sheet), sitting stuff (fold up chairs that compress into themselves, which take little space, are strong and comfortable), shower stuff (soap & shampoo, leave the fancy stuff at home, you don't want to dress up for the locals, you may look good enough to eat), cooking stuff (take basics, like kooker tops for gas bottles, a braai grid and alminium cooking flat bottomed pots, that fit into each other and can be used for stews and baking bread. Cast iron pots are too heavy), extra fuel stuff (?), extra water stuff (?) and, stuff and more stuff (Take less stuff, you need a knife and fork each with a teespoon or two and a spoon or two, a sharp/pairing knife, with a small grater and a measuring jug ). There is just not enough space (or weight limits for overloading !) While we have got rather good on cutting out stuff down to minimal, things are reaching a stage where we need to spend some money on her and it is either spend the money on upgrades or look at a new vehicle. (If you need excuses to buy a new vehicle, go out and do it, otherwise live in the space you have, and take the implemets you need, not what is nice to have or what the Jones's took with them.). It is not that we want more space for more stuff, just an easier way to pack our existing stuff Ok (Remember that drawer systems are heavier, take more space ang have less packing space than shelves. Make your shelves just big enough to take plastic boxes that will fit exactly into the shelves. In these you can pack, your clothes and groceries. Your clothes must preferably be bush colours, light so they wash easily and dry quickly, and do not need ironing.You only need about three sets of light clothing (the pants can be the zip off legs type with two t-shirts and a long sleeved shirt), with a warm weather proof jacket and an anorack, a pair of comfortable boots and slops and three thin pairs of socks and thermal long top and bottom for emergencies. You will need a washing machine and a drying wrack, for when your clothes do not dry sufficiently before nightfall, so you can hang them up inside the vehicle. Run cords along the roof lining.), I also need space for a fishing rod (take a fold up rod and minimum of whatever else you will need) and a drone and a telescope (you have binoculars, so leave the telescope at home) and a second camera body (one must see to all your needs, take wide angle and at least 600 mm lens to satisfy your photographic needs. Buy Panasonic Lumix with good lens and about 25X Optical zoom for a back up camera) with tripod. Is this to much to ask ? (If you want everything, buy an Iveco 4X4 or an overlanding truck, but then you have many other problems to contend with).

While we were away we saw a 79 landcruiser and it looked just about perfect. And then we got reading and a double cab Hilux popped up. A trailer is very much not an option.
The trailer is not an option, unless you want to take everything including the kitchen sink with you. You will need space to load everything you want to take with you. Life is about choices, you must start making yours.

The Questions:
In terms of overland travel, how often to you really need to use the full 4x4 capabilities of the car? Yes the LC is a burely 4x4, but how often to you really need all that 4x4 "power".
You can have the power and 4X4 abilities and very seldom need them, but when they are required, you will be very grateful that you had them.
Which offers more space the Hilux DC or the 79 DC ?
The Cruiser is bigger, so will always have more space.
Which has better fuel consumption the Hilux or the LC?
The Hilux will give you at least 3 km/l better fuel consumption.
Normally aspirated toyota's have a reputation of having parts readily available and generally can be repaired by bush mechanics. The Hilux is a turbo, what is the risk of blowing a turbo? And how tricky are they to repair in "darkest" africa? All our discussions with overlanders have been, not if it breaks down, but when. As something surely will go wrong and you want a bush mechanic to be able to fix it.
There are many Hiluxes all over Africa. A looked after vehicle will give you many more km's than you will drive in your year long trip in Africa.
Would you even travel into africa with a turbo car for 12 months? So may overlanders say stay away from turbo's?
They will often not recommend a turbo aftermarket system, which are prone to giving trouble, as the enjine was not designed for the turbo (After market System).
While we are very blessed that money is not (to much) of an issue, price (value) is a concern. The 2015 Hilux at R290K vs the 79LC at R450K one needs to be sure that there is R160K worth of value to be had for overlanding. (Oh yes, both are equally well kitted out)
The 2.5 is also a bit of a Donkey, but is very reliable. In Africa there is no rush and the roads are also mostly, not in a state to go faster, than the 2.5 will travel comfortably at. I chose the bigger 3.0 D4D above the Cruiser and have never been sorry. I average a sadately 9 – 10 km/p/l - Fully Loaded.
Which has better fuel consumption? The Hilux or LC
The Hilux will give you at least 3 km/l better fuel consumption.
What are the general running costs compared of the two vehicles?
The Hilux will be a lot cheaper to run than the L/C.
Do you guys know what the carry weight difference is between the Hilux and LC? Stuff = weight. Will moving from a 105 to a double cab give us more space to pack safely ?
Your Cruiser should have about the same carrying capacity as a Hilux. Remember that the D/C models will not have the same carrying/loading capaity as a S/C. You are used to your Cruiser and will know about the rattles that go with travelling on bad roads. The D/C vehicles with the load being distributed at the back, will be a lot quieter iro of the rattles, as they will mostly be confined to the back of the load bin.
I am sure some will say upgrade the suspension of 105 we already have. While not what I want in terms of repair, the other concern would be potential for overloading. By the time all the "static essential equipment is included on the car, there is not much room for anything else. Think roof rack, RTT, wheel carries (x2) and two spare wheels, rear bumber, 40l water, 130l fuel, 2 full jerry cans, front bumber, front winch, recovery gear, highlift jack AND we have not started loading the "stuff" yet.
When you speak about upgrading the suspension, there are many different variables. You have noted that after market suspensions are difficult to come by, the further north you go. I have for the same reason driven over 7 000 km with a broken shock, so know the feeling. You should seriously consider the option of using Load Hogg helper springs, which bolt onto your existing springs (Leaf Springs, the tension can also be set to a cetain extent). They will assist in preventing the sag at the back. The RTT will free up a lot of space for matresses, blankets, pillows, etc., time and effort. I would also keep the two wheel carriers and two spares. When you lose to tyres with gashes in the side walls in a distance of 20 km, and still have a long way to go, before you can get to any form of assistance, you will greatly appreciate the extra wheel. The 130l of fuel will get you to most places in a Hilux, but the Cruiser may need the full jerry cans as well. I have a 150L long range tank, which will get me about 1300 km of carful mixed driving (including sand/mud and rock crawling – which ould free up the two jerry cans), you would be lucky to get 900 km from the cruiser, under the same conditions. I also have a 50L water tank which is sufficient, if you use it for emergenciers, and cooking and for mixed cooldrink.. There is water all over for washing the clothes and yourselves. The highlift jack can also be used as a winch to cut down on weight, so either, or, make a choice. You also get bladders that you can fit into the footwells of your vehicle, for water or fuel (keeping the centre of gravity low).
I drove the old (1990's) LC single cabs and the rides were not that bad, although it was in a previous life, but with a loaded 2016 79 LC, will the ride still be an uncomfortable one? Surely suspension and vehicle design have changed?
The heavily loaded vehicle ride is much more comfortable than an empty one, which can be supplemented ith pillows, sleeping bags or blankets, to spread your weight out over and around your seating area. I use a small cushion on the arn rest against the door and a small cushion for the arm rest between the seats. These small non items, make the driving experience so much more comfortable.
And then lastly ......
would you move from a 4.2d 105gx to a double cab ? If you had to choose, the 2015 2.5td hilux or the 2016 79 4.2d LC?
When I was faced with the same decision, I opted for the 3.0 D4D Hilux. I looked at new, as it was just for the wife and I and it was for a 20 year project, as I was having it converted to a full time camped, which was my own design and kitted for two people, as opposed to three (in your case).
If you would like any further information, that I may be able to assist you with, you are free to contact me at
edgew60atgmaildotcom
I also have other information, that I will send you, that may assist you with your packing and your decisions.
Safe Travels,
Edge.
Image
HABOOB means "Dust Storm"

User avatar
ThysdJ
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 16657
Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 7:31 am
Town: Brackenfell
Vehicle: 2010 Hilux D4D 3.0 D/C 4x4
Real Name: Thys
Club VHF Licence: HC102
Location: Brackenfell
Contact:

Mon May 14, 2018 9:08 am

Hi Terry

Imagine bumping into you guys on the Hilux Forum. Welcome.

The guys below/above gave good advice and I have nothing really to add to that. These guys are very experienced in overland travels, and they know their stuff.

If you want to talk to somebody who has first hand knowledge and many many 1000's of 105 Cruiser overlanding km's under his belt you can contact Johann Tyre Viljoen of 1st Alignment in Stikland. He used to do long distance tours in his 105, and maybe he can give you some ideas on what "stuff" is really really necessary, and how to pack that "stuff" into Daisy.

Give me a call and we arrange for a cup of coffee sometime.
Thys de Jager
CEO and Refreshments Manager at Team Offroad.

2010 Hilux 3.0 D4D D/C 4x4 with GOMAD "Brood" Canopy. Tripod.
1997 Jeep Wrangler TJ 4.0 Sport. The original SFA. AGA... Gooi kole
email: thys@teamoffroad.co.za

Like Team Offroad on Facebook...

Slowones
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 10:59 pm
Town: Somerset West
Vehicle: LC105 GX
Real Name: Terry

Sun May 20, 2018 1:13 am

Hi Guys

Thank you all for the replies.

Based on what you guys have all added, we decided to weigh Daisy. With all her paraphernalia she weighs in at 3080kg, with a tare of 2300 and GVM of 3160.

No the paraphernalia, does not include the water, food and fuel. Oh and the Mrs.

However, what has happened is that we went to look at a 2.5srx kitted for overland as advertised on the other site. The boss fell in love with the practicality of it straight away. I was firmly told that the organisational capacity it would provide over the 105, but having access through the sides of the cab would mean she would be very happy. SO (!) happy in fact that she said should would even look past the supposed reliability concerns of a double cab vs a landcruiser 105. We are renting a landcruiser 79 for a weekend through the Cedaberg through some rough roads to see what it feels like driving one.

But while we are blessed to be able to afford the fuel, one does need to be sensible, fuel consumption of 14l/100km without sand driving (down to 20l/100km) it would be silly not to be concerned about fuel. A Hilux at 10l/100km is a considerable saving over a trip of 15000km. or more (6 months trip).

So now I need to ask, which Hilux to go for ? The 4x4 raiders seem like great cars, but these newer ones with that are all electronic do concern me.

Which ones would you suggest we look at ? Budget of say R300k leaving about 100k for canopies and drawers and any other add ons (long range tank).

What are the thoughts of the members?

User avatar
Baasvark
LR4WD, Lockers, Crawler Gears
LR4WD, Lockers, Crawler Gears
Posts: 1195
Joined: Mon Aug 01, 2011 7:45 pm
Town: Virginia
Vehicle: '97 D/C with all the trimmings & 2011 Troopy
Real Name: Shane

Sun May 20, 2018 3:31 pm

I must confess that I have never been on an overlanding trip and therefore have absolutely no experience.

My question: Are you mechanically minded? Can you do basic repairs and do you understand the electronics?

Will you be travelling alone? Sjould something go wrong will you be able to make a plan?

Are there any workshops, on your planned route, that could resolve any computer issues?

Personally i would keep it as simple as possible!

Sent from my SM-A720F using Tapatalk

Aint it ironic that "Common Sense" aint so common after all...

User avatar
pieta.swanepoel
High Range 4WD
High Range 4WD
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2017 1:21 pm
Town: Cape Town
Vehicle: Toyota Hilux SRX 2.5D-4D 4x4 SC
Real Name: Pieta

Mon May 21, 2018 6:58 am

You will struggle to find a Raider for 200k. In fact you will struggle to find a SRX for 200k. Unless it has a lot of km's on the clock. Not necesarary a bad thing but wou will never know were it had been and how the previous owner(s) had look after if. If you do buy, at least own if for a while before going on such a long trip. Just to make sure everything is sorted and working as it should.

You won't go wrong buying a Hilux in stead of a Cruiser
Groot berge en lang grondpaaie

Slowones
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 10:59 pm
Town: Somerset West
Vehicle: LC105 GX
Real Name: Terry

Mon May 21, 2018 8:47 am

The budget is R300k for a car.

A quick internet search had a few 2009 - 2011 raider 3.0 d4d in that price bracket with a range of mileage on it.

I just need to start wrapping my brain round all the models. 3.0 D4D, then 2.5 td SRX, then SR, then raider. Actually can someone point me in the direction of a website where I can do some reading?

I dont fancy all the electronic gadgetry of the post 2012 models (as seen from internet pics). Unless of course am being silly and driving through Africa with that screen and steering wheel functions is ok. Maybe I am being to silly.

Again, I am very open to comments.

Ok, maybe I should just take Thys up on an offer for coffee before I do anything silly.

User avatar
pieta.swanepoel
High Range 4WD
High Range 4WD
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2017 1:21 pm
Town: Cape Town
Vehicle: Toyota Hilux SRX 2.5D-4D 4x4 SC
Real Name: Pieta

Tue May 22, 2018 7:39 am

In SA we only have the 3.0D4D Raider and the 2.5D4D SRX. Other models will be for other countries.
The SRX is more spartan than the Raider. Interior, wheels (both rim and wheel size). But there is also engine differences eg. intercooler, turbo etc between the models.
Groot berge en lang grondpaaie

User avatar
Rebel 4x4
LR4WD, Lockers, Crawler Gears
LR4WD, Lockers, Crawler Gears
Posts: 1651
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:28 pm
Town: Port Elizabeth
Vehicle: 2014 Suzuki Jimny Fully kitted with every extra you can imagine that is available for a Jimny
Real Name: Thomas
Location: Port Elizabeth

Tue May 22, 2018 2:23 pm

79 4.2D LC double cab (2016) does not come with a service plan. And services are VERY pricey and servicing is every 7500km and wheel bearing replacement every 40 000km. This is now if you go according to the book so that your Toyota stays in tip top shape.

The 2.5td DC 4x4 Hilux (2015) will have a service plan up to 90 000km or 2020. Cheaper to maintain to the LC D/C..... So, hope this helps you a bit with the decision making.
Sent from my iPhone
Image
Image

Post Reply

Return to “General Hilux Discussions”

  • Information
  • Who is online

    Users browsing this forum: No registered users