An overlanding history

Tell us about your recent trip. Please add some photographs.
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Haboob
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:33 am

The Birth of our 4x4 Driving, Development and Overlanding.
During The 1990 we used to fish up and down the East Coast of the Eastern Cape as well as the Transkei Coast. We had various vehicles which were used to convey the Fishermen to and from the beach, which varied between Beach Buggies, Chev Nomads & Firenza’s, Land Rovers, Ford Escort, Suzuki, Mazda, Toyota bakkies and Land Cruisers. We would use just about anything that could have the tyres let down and be pushed through the sandy patches to drive from one fishing spot to the next along our coastline.
I think that one of the first Cruiser double cabs built was by one Tony Geer. He may also have started the trend of what is now known as the 4x4 trailer. There were smaller venter and other trailers towed up and down the beaches. Tony started the trend in our area of modifying a trailer with 15 inch wheels to match his bakkie and a cut down chest freezer which was used as a big cooler box in which to store the weekends catch of fish and getting it home before it started going off. We would fish hard during the day and then have a braai or potjie and party hard after a hard days fishing. We had no fancy tents and would just sleep next to the vehicle on the beach, unless it was raining then we would sleep under the vehicle using the vehicle as shelter. There were different spots which we would go to depending on which direction the wind was blowing from, so that we were sheltered from the prevailing winds or to get shelter if it was raining.
We eventually all started to buy 4x4 vehicles which were very expensive, expensive to run with huge tyres compared to the normal vehicles and heavy on fuel. By taking along a few friends we managed to get an outing once a month through sharing mostly petrol and food expenses. With more than one family using a 4x4 it became necessary to build off road trailers and people like Gary Dalton started building these trailers and selling them to fishermen. I purchased one of these trailers and made a big cooler box which was filled with ice and beer and bait for the weekends fishing trip. While fishing the beers would get less and any fish caught would be put into the cooler boxes to keep them full. The women would complain that their beer tasted and smelt like fish. With wives and children joining in the fishing excursions it became necessary to take chairs, wood, tents, clothing, towels and snax.
The fishing excursions became so popular that it was not long that this started a whole industry around the fishing excursions with gilly boys hired to help with collecting bait such as sand mussels, swimming prawn, mud prawn, red bait and catfish. I know that this had been done by our grandfathers, but I am trying to portray the birth of the 4x4 and beach driving in our known part of the world anyway. Naturally with commercialisation came the petty theft which led to more serious thefts and robberies being committed against the fishermen. The incidents were however not common as the fishermen started banning together with dogs being brought to the beach as alarms against night time raids. Those caught stealing from these fishing excursions were severely dealt with and this in itself was a deterrent against these raids. The hiring of gillies was also giving the locals job opportunities and they usually returned with left over food and money in the pocket. When most of us had our own vehicles we started taking the family to the fishing trips with us to share in the experience of the weekends on the beach. The ladies mostly tanned and looked after the children, while the men fished (some ladies also took to fishing).
I think that it is important for my records also to mention the other main role players in this saga. My wife Vivienne and her cousin Wendy married best friends Edge (I, me and myself) and Eddie, who have been friends for thirty eight years. He was also a witness and my best man when I made my wedding vows. We started our married lives holidaying together on the South Coast, at Port Edward and still braai and spend time together although him and Wendy have grown old and gone into hibernation together. Viv and I, being much younger are continuing with our foolish carefree lives doing plenty of irresponsible things and still getting away with it.
The other couple we were deeply involved with were Louis and Nannie who after spending their earlier excursions with us, in which we developed the kitchens firstly and then developed the then unheard of 4x4 Aluminium Canopies.
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The evenings would be spent together while braaing somewhere sheltered and chatting into the night until crashing in the back of the vehicles. We progressed with small two man tents for the children and adults alike and made awnings which were tied between the vehicles to form shelters from the rain. If the wind picked up these would have to be manned and held down to prevent them from being ripped by the wind. Photographs from this time are however as scarce as hens teeth.
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We however had a lot of fun and some of us even started purchasing roof top tents which were new on the market. This made the weekend getaway so much quicker and easier and enjoyable for mom and the kids. We even purchased three way freezers to keep the beer and ice lasting for a whole long weekend. With good weather we could sleep at the high water mark, which was as close to the crashing waves as you could get and caused some scares, when the high tide started eating the sand out under the bakkies wheels.
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Here our 4x4 excursions started when we started driving to the Transkei Coast, where the drive there was taken along motor bike and long forgotten tracks which had been in use before the independence of the Transkei by the white farmers who had lived in the area. There was a lot of excitement from the local kids who in some instances had never seen white people before in their short lives. There were occasions where we got stuck and had to help each other out of the situation. We visited the Jacaranda wreck.
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We camped at the clearing in the bush a stones throw from the old wreck on the Transkei Coast. The deep freezes were removed from the canopies to sleep next to the vehicles, but were tied down in the vehicles to stop them from bouncing around whilst travelling. We also connecyed them to 12 V plugs run from the battery to the canopy while we were travelling. This was pre-dual battery systems and worked into extended overlanding.
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To be continued later ......
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:43 am

To be continued later ......
Please Edge.Dont let us wait.This is AWSOME to read :thumbup:
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:50 am

A fantastic report. Thanks for sharing. Things were so much simpler then.
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 4:36 pm

I once also sat vas down to the axles in that black mud in exactly the same spot as that Nissan (going down to the Jacaranda). There's a bit of a spring above that slope that runs for quite a while after there have been rains. :D:

A pity that we never thought to take pics of our excursions along that coast! :(
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 4:42 pm

Continuing ....



When the writing was on the wall, prior to being stopped from driving on the beaches, we started talking about overlanding. We used these trips to the Transkei Coast as preparation to our overlanding excursions. We started experimenting with awnings and packing systems. The good old ammo box was tried and tested. This was used in place of the old butcher shop meat trays which were purchesed to use in which to stow the fishing tackle. They had no lids and after having things blown off the top of moving vehicles, we started making cargo nets or rope fastenings on these to keep expensive property safe.
This was done whilst honing our four wheel driving skills in the mountains and glens, through sand and bush and just generally learning what our vehicles could or could not do through trial and error. Different tyre pressures were tested in different terrains and banks were used as purchase against which a wheel was forced to help against a side slope, preventing a vehicle from rolling against an embankment causing damage.
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We started looking at making a kitchen unit, which would be used for all the kitchen implements as well as groceries and a two plate gas stove as well as a small gas bottle, which would then all be stored together. This would make cooking easier with all the kitchen goodies kept together in one big box and readily available to the cook of the day.
This was done over a period of time with trial and error being used as a learning experience as there was nothing like this on the market that we knew about and nothing was seen in camping stores, magazines and from other campers met on our fishing trips or wanderings around on camping trips. Prior to this we had gone camping or on holiday for two or three weeks a year to the Natal South Coast. Camping equipment consisted of the basics with campers or caravaners using mainly skottel braai’s and potjies for their holidays. Gas was also used with normal home cookware in which vegetables and other dishes and puddings were cooked and prepared for the family meals.
The normal plastic chairs were swopped for fold up camping chairs which also went through a metamorphosis of their own. This was a help with space saving, compared to the old wooden fold flat chair.
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Plastic tables with removable legs became the trend for campers which now allowed campers to use a camping table instead of the tailgate of the bakkie. I am sure that this was initiated because of the ladies complaining that the bread was being spread and meat spiced on the same surface trampled by many feet and the cutting of bait and cleaning of fish. We spent our wedding anniversary on the storm battered Transkei Coast. We had a glorious three course meal with friends in the rainy cold conditions right on the beach.
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The next morning we were visited by many of the people from our home-town who had beach cottages in the vicinity to see how we had fared. They were of course very surprised to see that we had come through the night unscathed and were making and enjoying a hearty breakfast the next morning, before knocking the camp down and moving on down the coast before making our way home again. This was through tidal rivers and sandy tracks.
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We even tried our hand at photography, even if it was expensive in those days with “mik-en-druk” before we purchased cameras with lenses and spools that needed to be developed after returning from a weekend away from home. This was also when I purchased my first electronic electrical negative pole anti-rust pulser, which did a lot in preventing the cancerous rust that engulfed the vehicles of many fisherman of the time. Mine was largely unscathed while attending the same outings and driving through the same salt water rivers.
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We spent many a weekend in Louis garage in which we measured cut and developeped camping must haves for our trips and became known as “Die Maak ‘n Plan Broers”.
Louis & Nannie eventually fell completely off the rails and returning to their second childhood and motor cycles of their youth. They have now built a sidecar onto their “Stuttutu” and now tour on the bike. These Photographs were scanned from old prints by Louis and needs to be thanked again, as without them I would have had no image records.
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:26 pm

More often than not we were lucky to find that river mouth silted up, so didn't have to 'get wet'. There is a place further along where you could only cross at low tide with a rock face on one side and the sea on the other, (just before "Knuckles" on the way to Mbolompo if I recall correctly) otherwise you had to go inland a bit for a roundabout route.

A nice little trip in the days when one was allowed to go along the coast. ;-)
When your road comes to an end ...... you need a HILUX!.

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Life is like a jar of Jalapeño peppers ... what you do today, might burn your ass tomorrow.
Don't take life too seriously ..... no-one gets out alive.
It's not about waiting for storms to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain.
And be yourself ..... everyone else is taken!
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:17 pm

2002 Namibia Trip

Thanks to “Kort Broek” our fishing excursions were a thing of the past. We had nothing to do, as fishing along our coast as we had known it no longer existed. With hindsight I can now also say that “perlemoen” poaching would never have taken off at the scale that it has reached, if the fishermen were still patrolling the fishing waters along our coast.
We tried stopping close to the attainable fishing spots and walking to the waters edge to fish, but the vehicles were getting broken into and even stolen when left unattended. The petty criminals even got so brazen as to break into the vehicles parked a few hundred metres from where you were fishing and then running into the sea bush when seen and being chased. The only remaining was option was to sell the 4x4 or to use it for another recreational pastime.
This was either 4x4 driving obstacles (trails) or using the vehicle for overlanding. The nature of 4x4 trails was more competition type excursions which were not family orientated in those days and there were not many places that were geared for this type of activity. We had been toying with the travel idea and had slowly been gearing up for this with long week-ends away with the family and friends and honing our driving and overlanding skills.
We eventually built kitchens for ourselves which contained everything from groceries to two plate gas stoves as well as cutlery and crockery. We had purchased deep freezers which were connected to run on 12v while travelling and could be used on 220v electricity while in a caravan site. If we stopped in the bush we could run the freezers off gas.
This system worked very well but you could not afford to have the freezer run off the bakkie battery whilst the engine was not running, otherwise the battery would run completely flat in the time that it took you to go into a shop to buy cigarettes or bread. This necessitated the connecting the system onto the ignition, so that the power to the freezer was cut when the vehicle was switched off.
We would take the freezers out the canopies at night as fibreglass canopies are very flammable and would burn like petrol if given half the opportunity. The kitchens and freezers were tied down at the back of the canopy and everything else was packed behind the cab in containers which bounced around on the bad roads as well as on 4x4 tracks. We built in long range tanks which was a lot of trial and error with the red gold (petrol) often seen spilling down the street or road during our fishing excursions, blocking off the extra tank and fixing again on our return.
We also learned that we could not keep things like bread reasonable edible without a fridge, so we used cooler boxes in which to keep butter, cheese, salad ingredients and left over foods for brunch the next day. The only way to keep these items fresh was by continually buying ice, wherever it could be found. This was a continuous problem, as bought ice was usually the smallest blocks that melted in record time. These ice blocks were also often hollow in the centre or had a hole in the middle, so that they could be made quickly and cheaply by the seller concerned. The learning curve was working out very expensive.
We planned our first excursion to the Kgalagadi National Park and then onto Etosha Pan in Namibia after which we would do a bit of 4x4 driving through Kwoharib Schlutte on up to Epupa Falls and down home again along the West Coast until reaching Cape Town, before returning home to the Eastern Cape. This was to be a super long trip which we planned to do over a period of about four weeks. We packed the vehicles to the rafters and were ready to move at 03:00 the following morning.
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Firstly we had to fill the thirsty Hiluxes before leaving on the long arderous journey to Wit Rivier. We had to check things like consumption of the fully laden 4x4’s on the long road, so that we knew how far we could get before requiring to top up the juice levels again. Spare fuel tanks were purchased at scrapyards and fitted by yourself , as there were no 4x4 fitment centres at the time, hence the trial and error motif and the “maak ’n plan broers”. We were very optimistic about how far we could travel in a day, as our first days travel was probably to two hundred kilometres past Upington, giving us a total of about 1000 kms in the first day. We made out first stop for fuel on the northern side of Upington where I stopped at the pump and the attendant started filling up. We were chatting and I was watching the pump nearing 110 litres when I told the attendant that he must not go past R50.00 as that was all the money I had on me. He nearly had a heart attack, but after a good laugh we told him to fill up to the brim.
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We carried on to Witsand where we camped in a dry river bed below the Police Station. A braai was the order of the day before bedtime. The Kgalagadi was a new experience to us as we had never before visited one of our National Parks.
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Maybe this is a good time to inform the folk that didn’t know that the Red Double Cab was known as the Donkey and belonged to yours truly while the White Single Cab belonged to Louis. The Meer cats (ground squirrels) at Twee Rivieren were very tame and photogenic. The Black Backed Jackals were entertaining and very busy and always had something to do.
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We slowly made our way up to Nossob campsite as we had entered the Reserve early that morning. The Oryx or Gemsbok were everywhere and could never make up their minds if they wanted to be photographed or to run. They seemed to run for the pleasure of being able to run. What a graceful creature with its sabre like antlers. We did see Lions in the dunes, but they were a bit far away and just resting through the midday hours when the sun was at its warmest. They made a nearby Springbok nervous about his chosen patch of turf.
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Nossob Campsite was very nice with big Camel Thorn trees to park under for their shade which they provided. We were entertained by the begging ground squirrels, which supplied plenty of photo opportunities. I must also add that at this time we were also experimenting with quick drying materials which were used for the clothing that we wore. This was so that when the clothes were worn and washed, that they would dry quickly. We had noticed that ordinary cotton clothing when wet would take a very long time to dry causing a problem in the traveller’s wardrobe. We used what was known as parachute material, which was quickly changed to parasuite material by Nannie who was our seamstress and made clothing for Louis and I from this quick drying wonder. The next day we left early and did the dunes route towards the other campsite, Mata-Mata, situated in the northwest of the park where we were booked to spend the second night in the park.
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The game viewing was relaxed and we stopped at the picnic site for a brunch before continuing on our leisurely route towards Mata-Mata. This was not as nice as Nossob, but we found another shady site near the blutions where we spent an uneventful evening braaing and chatting through our new found adventure.
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I must add that there were Jackals and Badgers that came into the camps after dark, which we watched rummaging around the campsites after everyone had gone to bed. In the wee-wee hours of the next morning I was awoken by a very sick Viv, who needed to go to the ablution facilities to get violently sick. The heaving did not sound very healthy in the dawn light of the new day and the anti-nausea tablets and other “muti” taken was of no assistance in quelling the runs.
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This was not a pleasant way to start a new adventure, but by stopping when it was absolutely necessary it was possible to get out the park and get a few photographs of game sightings, so that we could show friends back home, on our return, all the wonderful places we had been to and what we had seen.
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This is when we had another funny incident with a new invention we had. I have often seen how people are frustrated by needing to go to the Loo in the wee hours of the night and having to clamber down the ladder of the roof top tent (RTT) to relieve themselves. Well we sorted this problem out promptly after acquiring our RTT's. We used stay soft bottles which had the top cut off neatly, so as not to have sharp edges. These bottles could just about take a litre and a half of liquidgold. They could comfortably be used by both sexes and were easily stowed in the pocket of the RTT. After use it was easily places outside on the top of the canopy or in one of the boxes stowed in the canopy, so that it did not fall over and spill if there were any high jinks taking place in that particular vehicle. Well while travelling out the park where higher speeds were reached we noticed rain drops on our windscreen. This was from the Stay Soft bottle on the roof of the vehicle travelling in front of us, who had not emptied and washed their bottle that morning. We stopped them and they set the problem right so we could continue without the added problem of rain.

Well we made our way through the border post at Rietfontein and continued up through the red dunes of the Kalahari to the farm of friends, Willem & Magda where the next two nights were spent. They have a good early warning system in place in that when the neighbours at the turn-off onto the D606 see the vehicles passing their home, they notify the recipient farm to which the visitors are heading and they leave to form a welcoming committee. We spent two days on the farm visiting the camps and stock with the relaxed couple who were old school friends of Louis and Nannie. They were also interested in our mode of transport and we chatted about what we had done to make life on the road easier. After a good “kuier” and braai’s we left for Windhoek the next day and visited the Dutch Reform Church on the hill.
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Wanting to be out the city we continued on the Okahandja where we stayed at what was to become known as “geraas kamp” with the passing traffic on the main north/south artery in Namibia. Naturally we were drawn to the flea market in the town the next morning before leaving for the road north. Louis and Nannie are elephant people, so are always intrigued by the sculptures of these animals, which can be found all over their home.
They would look for different ways to display these animals in their lounge, bar and anywhere else where they can be admired. We on the other hand are not curious people who see these things as clutter which were dust collectors in the home.
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From this point we worked ourselves northwards, intrigued by the changing scenery in which there was no shortage of wild animals along the roads leading north. Many of the farms passed on the road wee game farms and we were also confronted by the many farm stalls which were selling biltong and nicknack's along the way.
We turned off the main artery at Otavi where we took the gravel road towards the Outjo Lake which was situated on a farm and which had been used as a free fall deep dive record attempt. Lake Otjikoto was a few kilometres further down the road and on the main artery towards Ovamboland and towards the East Gate of the Etosha Pan Game Reserve.
Lake Otjikoto was much more commercialised and had plenty curios in their little tourism shop. The surrounding little camps had game that was there to be viewed from close up and made for perfect photo’ opportunities, but one could not help feeling sorry for animals being held in captivity in such small enclosures.
I was surprised to see that there were fresh water fish in the lakes as well as wild duck swimming around on the water far below.The Outjo Lake was mainly undeveloped and left to its own devices. It did seem as though water was pumped out the lake for farming purposes or for use of the owner in his home for drinking water. There were no signs that the water was used for irrigation as everything was dry bush veldt around the lake, which was a pity as there were many possibilities with that amount of water around.
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In contrast to this the OtjikotoLake was used to supply the nearby town of Outjo with water and the Lake was used to generate tourism. There were trees and plants planted to make the place more attractive with the small zoo in place. There was also a camp site which could be used, but with the passing traffic on the road adjacent to the camp site we did not want to spend two nights after each other next to a busy road network, which had a knack if inhibiting the little sleep we could get after a long day on the road.
Here we also learned that the Germans had dumped their cannons into this lake during the First World War to avoid having them fall into the hands of the closing in South African troops who would capture the weapons and then use them for their war effort. There were bigger enclosures at the back where Eland and Kudu were kept in a camp with one or two gemsbok if I can remember correctly.
The set up was very nice for a few hours entertainment, if one was not in too much of a hurry, as was our case with time to burn before our appointment with the Premier Game Park in Namibia.
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Even though it was late afternoon and we were only booked at Etosha the next day, we decided to leave and spend the night closer to the gate, as we wanted to get into the park as early as possible to utilise the time available to us in the park to the best of our abilities. We set off to the park in the late afternoon and on finding no camp sites closer to our destination, we decided to camp next to the road after the turn-off to the park.
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We found a nice camp site with a rubbish bin about three kilometres from the gate and set up for the night. Here we had another surprise. We heard an approaching vehicle and before long a vehicle with local registration numbers appeared and slowed down and stopped on the opposite side of the road from where we were camped. A passenger alighted from the vehicle, crossed the road to the rubbish bin next to out parked vehicles and deposited a packet of rubbish into the bin. He greeted friendly and ran back to the waiting vehicle which had four other occupants and climbed back into the vehicle, before it left in the direction of the Park Gate.
We were gob-smacked as this was something alien to us seeing the locals using the rubbish bins next to the road instead of just throwing the rubbish out their vehicle window.
We had a pleasant evening with no further traffic for the rest of the night. We would have thought that we would have seen game through the fence in the park, but no such luck for us.
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The next morning we were up early and waiting outside the gate before opening time, when we were let in by friendly officials.
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The Gate was near Namatoni Camp site which is situated at the old German Fort of the troops that were stationed there as protection against the marauding Herero’s of the time. This was not a popular campsite and our plan was to drive from east to west through the park and spend the night at Okaukuejo Campsite on the western side of the Park.
We soon started seeing game with Zebra and buck species seen next to the road. The turn-off to Dik-Dik Draai was taken to see the smallest African antelope which were plentiful in this part of the park.
Excitement was rife when we saw Lion walking in the bush a few hundred metres from the road. A short way back we had seen a game path leading to a nearby watering hole. We made our way to this spot as the Lion could not be seen through the bush and were rewarded after a few minutes by the whole pride walking past our waiting vehicles.
This was the highlight of our trip seeing a whole pride of young Lions a few minutes after entering the Park. They were so close to us that we could see that one of the females had two different coloured eyes. The males were so young that they hardly had manes and one could only wonder how these young animals could have taken over this young and healthy pride of Lionesses. It was also obvious from their bulging bellies and the blood around their mouths that they had just come from a kill. With ten lions in the pride, we made the assumption that it would not have been a little Dik-Dik that would have satisfied the hunger of this pride of felines. These magnificent creatures joined the road in front of our parked vehicles and regally led us towards the water hole to which they marched in the tune of our rumbling engines. They were unperturbed by the close proximity of our vehicles and when called by the way that kittens were called, we were given the look that told us in no uncertain terms what would happen if we were to get out of our safety cocoon.
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The males in this pride were far too big to still be the sons of the females in this pride. The females were all sleek and in perfect condition, and it was apparent that none of them were older than the rest. There were no battle scared older cats amongst them. They stayed together and caused a lot of nervousness from the other animals that were close to the waterhole, but too far from us to get nice pictures. We watched for a while, while they drank their fill at the water’s edge and then left to see what other delights the park had to offer.
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We told people at Namatoni who were loudly wondering where the big cats could be found, where we had seen them. They made a beeline for their vehicles and rushed to the site with friends and families in tow.



To be continued ........
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Wed Oct 15, 2014 1:20 pm

Please Edge.Dont let us wait.This is AWSOME to read

Thanx George, but I am a bit clueless with these things, so I loaded everything on a memory stick for Andy and took it to him in East London. :oops: :blushing: :blushing:
He then loads whenever he gets an oppertunity, so it becomes a surprise for me as well. Also new reading material for me. :lmao: :lmao: :lmao:
Thanx Andy... :surrender:
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Real Name: Stef

Wed Oct 15, 2014 3:35 pm

I remember as kid the days in and out we spend on the beach driving many miles down the shoreline for good fishing spots( Mapelane, St Lucia, Vidal, Numerous places in Mozam). Some days we had to wait for high tide to get back home etc. I still dont see any sea turtles getting their eggs on the beach without being eaten by the locals in mozam though... And as you said the poaching is sooooo much worse now we cant patrol... Miss my youth a lot think of those days...
Hangover(A.K.A die speelding)
1976 FJ45 4x4
1UZ-FE 4.0vvti
2" OME Suspension lift
1.5" Shackle lift
35" Geo MT's
Custom Bullbar
Lockright Locked rear
York OBA
20" LED bar
Nighthawk 100W spots

Dakar
2013 3.0D-4D 4x4 Hilux Dakar
Dewald Posthumus
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Real Name: Dewald

Wed Oct 15, 2014 3:56 pm

Feeeeesh, where are the photos of the feeesh! I love fishing, please share some of those photos as well!
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Haboob
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Thu Oct 16, 2014 7:25 am

Sorry, those were on a seperate trip and did not make it to Andy for posting...
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HABOOB means "Dust Storm"
Basjan14
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Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:35 pm

Awesome read! Ek voel nou asof ek nog net die eerste van die 3 godfather movies gesien het...
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4x4BEES
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Fri Oct 17, 2014 3:50 pm

Amazing tales.

Wonderful to read them.
Thank you for sharing them and the pics are awesome :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Haboob
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Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:03 am

Continuing .....


The game viewing rewards were plentiful in relation to the South African Park we had left a few days earlier and we saw a great variety of animals in the day we spent travelling in the Park.
I would recommend this Park to anyone and it was found to be far superior to any of our parks which we had visited to date. There were plenty of wide open spaces to view game and the roads were good if a bit corrugated at times.
2002 30.jpg

The grass was still green and lush in places and this did make game viewing difficult in the bush, but there was sufficient game at hand to be viewed and photographed at leisure.
2002 31.jpg
2002 32.jpg

The water holes were stacked with animals from the same herds to be trying to dominate each other. There was plenty of place to rest up near the waterholes which were not infested with predators.
2002 33.jpg

Elephants were seen all over with the grumpy old males minding their own business away in the bush and the matriarchs leading their family units to all the important places that only they knew about. Those not hell bent of getting to important meetings just hung out chewing the cud.

During the afternoon, being close to our destination we spent about an hour at the Elephant water hole when we were informed by a mature male that we should move on. There were a number of vehicles parked in the parking area next to the water hole that immediately started their vehicles and made a hasty retreat. This seemed to satisfy the big fellow who ambled away at his own time.
2002 34.jpg
2002 35.jpg


To be continued ......
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HABOOB means "Dust Storm"
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Toppie4x4
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Real Name: Andre

Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:39 am

Baie lekker leestof...............mens wil net die pad vat :thumbup: :thumbup:
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