No brakes

Discuss modifications on your 1979 to late 1998 SFA 4x4 Hilux here.
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Jimj
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 8:27 pm
Town: Boksburg
Vehicle: Toyota DC 2.2 4X4 1996
Real Name: Jim
Club VHF Licence: none

Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:53 pm

Evening all.
Need some help on how to improve the brakes on a 1996 Toyota DC 4X4. I've put in a Lexus V8. Absolute monster. But it takes along time to stop.
Do I change the brake pad quality?
Do I change the booster to a double diaphragm?
Is there a mod to the brake cylinder or change to a different one?
Can I change the calipers to bigger ones with bigger pads on the front? Are there calipers that are interchangeable between models?
What can I do to the back drums?
Jim

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Mud Dog
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Posts: 28629
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 2:18 am
Town: East London
Vehicle: '90 SFA Hilux DC 4X4, Full OME, 110mm lift. Brospeed branch, 50mm ss freeflow exhaust. 30 x 9.5 Discoverer S/T's on Viper mags. L/R tank. (AWOL) '98 LTD 2.4 SFA, dual battery system. Dobinson suspension, LR tanks, 31" BF mud's.
Real Name: Andy
Club VHF Licence: HC103

Wed Nov 15, 2017 9:32 pm

A big safety issue and the problem is compounded by having the extra power / speed. Additionally, if you have bigger diameter tyres / wheels fitted, the braking power is reduced since the wheels have more leverage against the brakes.

You can try PowerBrake. (They have centres up your way). From what I have heard the change the discs and fit their brake pads - not too cheap but makes a marked difference and some guys will swear by them.

Otherwise you can fit Cruiser 75 discs and calipers - straight fit, but more pricey than the PowerBrake option, yet apparently more effective. You can further improve braking by fitting a bigger master cylinder and / or upgrading the booster.

Most of the braking power comes from the front wheels but having the rear ones working optimally is just as important. Much of the above will affect only the front brakes, so after you got the front sorted it is equally important to set up the rear. There's not much you can do with the drums & slave cylinders themselves other than firstly making sure they are in good order and working. Then (a factor that is very often overlooked) you have to set up the LSPV since it will have been adjusted for the originally weaker front brakes. Adjust it incrementally until the rear wheels start locking under braking with no load and then slack off the adjustment fractionally so that there is no more rear wheel lock up.

Good luck and let us know how it goes. :winkx:
When your road comes to an end ...... you need a HILUX!.

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Don't take life too seriously ..... no-one gets out alive.
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The Legend
Monster Truck
Monster Truck
Posts: 3439
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 6:53 am
Town: Kempton Park
Vehicle: 1)1989 Toyota Hilux 2.2 4y EFI D/C 4X4 Full Mikem suspension ,extra long range tank,Duel battery system,31 Bridgestone Duelers 697 A\T FJ 75 front disc with KZTE calipers ,Kurisun PT 8100 two way mobile radio Hi-Lux call sign HC 121
Real Name: Dawie
Club VHF Licence: X93-

Thu Nov 16, 2017 4:12 am

Mud Dog wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 9:32 pm
A big safety issue and the problem is compounded by having the extra power / speed. Additionally, if you have bigger diameter tyres / wheels fitted, the braking power is reduced since the wheels have more leverage against the brakes.

You can try PowerBrake. (They have centres up your way). From what I have heard the change the discs and fit their brake pads - not too cheap but makes a marked difference and some guys will swear by them.

Otherwise you can fit Cruiser 75 discs and calipers - straight fit, but more pricey than the PowerBrake option, yet apparently more effective. You can further improve braking by fitting a bigger master cylinder and / or upgrading the booster.

Most of the braking power comes from the front wheels but having the rear ones working optimally is just as important. Much of the above will affect only the front brakes, so after you got the front sorted it is equally important to set up the rear. There's not much you can do with the drums & slave cylinders themselves other than firstly making sure they are in good order and working. Then (a factor that is very often overlooked) you have to set up the LSPV since it will have been adjusted for the originally weaker front brakes. Adjust it incrementally until the rear wheels start locking under braking with no load and then slack off the adjustment fractionally so that there is no more rear wheel lock up.

Good luck and let us know how it goes. :winkx:
Andy you must use the Cruiser 75 ventlitated dics with KZ-TE calipers and not the Cruiser 75 calipors
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Mud Dog
Moderator
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Posts: 28629
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 2:18 am
Town: East London
Vehicle: '90 SFA Hilux DC 4X4, Full OME, 110mm lift. Brospeed branch, 50mm ss freeflow exhaust. 30 x 9.5 Discoverer S/T's on Viper mags. L/R tank. (AWOL) '98 LTD 2.4 SFA, dual battery system. Dobinson suspension, LR tanks, 31" BF mud's.
Real Name: Andy
Club VHF Licence: HC103

Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:54 am

Thanks for the correction Dawie. :thumbup:
When your road comes to an end ...... you need a HILUX!.

Image
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Life is like a jar of Jalapeño peppers ... what you do today, might burn your ass tomorrow.
Don't take life too seriously ..... no-one gets out alive.
It's not about waiting for storms to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain.
And be yourself ..... everyone else is taken!

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Cheetah Drakie
Low Range 4WD
Low Range 4WD
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:50 am
Town: Nelspruit
Vehicle: Toyota Hilux 2.7i
Real Name: Peter
Location: Nelspruit

Thu Nov 16, 2017 7:17 am

Will the Cruiser 75 ventilated discs and KZ-TE callipers work on a IFS petrol Hilux too? Sounds like an good option. Also considering a Powerbrake setup.

Thanks Guys

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Family_Dog
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Posts: 12768
Joined: Tue May 22, 2007 10:09 am
Town: Klerksdorp
Vehicle: Hilux DC SFA, Hilux 2.7 DC, Hilux 2.7 SC, Prado 95 VX
Real Name: Eric
Club VHF Licence: HC101
Location: Klerksdorp, NW
Contact:

Thu Nov 16, 2017 7:38 am

If Powerbrakes still stock the SFA kit, it is a worthwhile investment. They make a huge difference! One of the best mods I have fitted to Bulldog.


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Mars
LR4WD, Lockers, Crawler Gears
LR4WD, Lockers, Crawler Gears
Posts: 1287
Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 12:33 pm
Town: Pretoria
Vehicle: Toyota Hilux Dakar 2.8 GD-6 DC 4X4
Real Name: Marnus
Location: Pretoria Oos
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Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:57 am

Compare the costs of the different options i.e. replacing the calipers, disks and pads vs the powerbrake option. You do not even need to get the powerbrake disks as the only benefit they provide is the slots in the discs which work away mud to ensure braking even in muddy conditions and have wear indicator slots milled into the disks.

I would get the brake pads they sell first and see how it goes.

Jimj
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 8:27 pm
Town: Boksburg
Vehicle: Toyota DC 2.2 4X4 1996
Real Name: Jim
Club VHF Licence: none

Thu Nov 16, 2017 7:13 pm

Many thanks Mud Dog and Dawie. I'll keep you informed.
Jim

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