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Replacing waterpump and timing belt on 3.0 D4-D Hilux by Marnus (click here to ask questions)

As far as part numbers are concerned. According to Toyodiy the Toyota part number for the whole pump assembly is 16100-09260. The pump I bought is a GMB pump made in Japan. The quality of the casting, impeller and finish of the pump appear very good. The GMB part number on the box for the pump only is W19850 and for the pump with the second part of the casing is W19850A.

In the Control Instruments Parts catalogue the pump only is listed as QCP9850 and the pump with casing is QCP9850 BH. The latter is the one I got.

So here goes my first attempt at a report on fixing a vehicle. I did not take as many pics as I wanted too but should have enough to give a fair idea of what to do. I have never replaced a water pump on a Toyota D4D but the basics remain the same. The problem I was faced with is that the pump on my bakkie is a one-piece unit with the left hand side of the pump (when the engine is viewed from the front) is bolted down underneath the alternator bracket whilst on the right hand side there is a portion of the pump housing that extends up and to the right underneath the timing belt cover. This means that a heck of a lot of ancillaries needs to be removed in order to get the pump free. As stated in an earlier post there is another pump design with a separate casing bolted in place under all the stuff and a pump that bolts onto that. Had my bakkie been fitted with the latter it would most probably have been a 2 hour job at most. Sadly some idiot at Toyota decided to fit the single piece unit thus ensuring that two billable hours can be converted into about 6 to 7 hours or alternatively they managed to get the single piece units much cheaper or probably both!! I really swore at them for a while and then got over it and jumped into doing the job.

Because you need to remove the camshaft timing belt it is crucial that you get all the relevant timing marks aligned before removing the belt and tensioner. How I went about it is as follows:

First I removed the intercooler cover.
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This is to give a better view of the camshaft pulley cover and the cam pulley ultimately.
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Next step is to remove the cam belt cover. It is held down by 6 bolts and is quite easy to achieve. Also note the timing mark (arrow) on the cover (circled).
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Here is the timing belt cover with the seepage that was flung from the waterpump pulley clearly visible.
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Now I got the timing marks aligned. At first I looked at the bottom of the crankshaft pulley area to see if there is a mark but no luck.
Then I found the mark at the 3’0 clock position when the engine is viewed from the front. At the tdc position a notch in the crank pulley aligns with a very prominent ridge/line in the casing. Note the edge of the crank pulley is pink due to the seepage.
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The camshaft pulley has a line in the outer rim of the pulley and the plastic cover behind the pulley has a (not very precise) arrow pointing downwards. The marks should line up on the 12’0 clock position when viewed directly from the front. Just align the line on the pulley exactly in the middle of the arrow. This pic is taken at a slight angle.
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The mark for the injector pump pulley has an arrow on the casing behind the pulley and a notch on the pulley. The problem is that the mark is underneath a sender unit that is located there and is only visible directly from the front. I took a picture with my cell phone camera and here is the mark and the notch clearly visible and already aligned. And here I was always thinking that cameras in cellphones are a waste!
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At this point I disconnected the battery as I did not want anyone (especially my little 3 foot terrorist, who is very keen to help and likes to play in the cab while I am working) to crank the starter! You are also going to remove the alternator later and don't want any shorts.

Now to get some space to work. First I removed the air cleaner to be able to get to the aircon pump and alternator.
This is a (bad) pic of the area you need to work in to remove the powersteering pump and alternator.
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Then I removed the serpentine belt. You are supposed to use a Toyota special tool to pull back the tensioner but I found that using a 14 mm spanner on the bolt head securing the tensioner pulley works really well as the spring is not that strong. The tension is released in a clockwise direction (ie. as if you are tightening the bolt on the pulley) Swing back the tensioner and slip the belt off. Then I removed the power steering pump. It is held to a bracket by four M8 bolts with a 12mm bolt head. First I disconnected the wire to the aircon pump and then undid the 4 bolts. A note of warning – These bolts sat like hell. I could not believe how tight they were and nearly ended up stripping one’s head because I did not realise that my no 12 Gedore socket is damaged. (Don’t ask me how but never lend out your tools!!!!) Here is a pic of the bracket with the pump removed.
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I then removed the aircon pump bracket. This bracket has to be removed to give access to the bracket holding the alternator. First unbolt the plate holding the wires secure and then the 4 M10 bolts with 14mm heads. Tight but easy to remove. This bracket has an idler pulley attached to it. I cleaned the antifreeze deposits off the pulley and inspected for play or noisy operation. All fine.
In this picture you can see the alternator bracket against the waterpump flange (black Arrow) which is the reason why you need to remove everything and the two bolts you cannot get to with the powersteering pump bracket in place (red arrows).
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Now the alternator bracket. First I removed the wires from the alternator. Then the 4 bolts holding the bracket to the engine block. Two of these bolts at the front and are the ones bolting onto the waterpump as well. Also note that the alternator itself is also bolted to a brace at the bottom supporting it from the engine block to the alternator. Any one of these bolts can be removed. I removed the bolt in the alternator (arrowed).
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The bracket and the alternator is now free to be removed. It is not necessary to remove the alternator from the bracket. The two idler and tensioner pulleys were also inspected for play and noisy operation and cleaned. The alternator pulley was also cleaned.

With the area now open this gave me space to undo the visco fan. I used an old timing belt and a vice grip to hold the pulley whilst undoing the 4 nuts.
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Next was to remove the cambelt tensioner pulley, tensioner and belt. The tensioner pulley is attached with a bolt requiring a 10mm Allen key (which was very tight too) and the tensioner with two small bolts (10mm head). All relatively easy to remove. See the pic of the tensioner assembly further on in the post for reference. (the pic with the pin in place in the tensioner)

Unfortunately the one end of the water pump is under the rear part of the cam belt cover and it is bolted to the engine block and cylinder head with a few bolts. Unfortunately also there is also a bolt and nut behind the cam pulley attaching the rear of the cover to the cylinder head. This means the cam pulley had to be removed. The bolt and nut is visible underneath the cam pulley in this pic.
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I was really hoping this would not be required as it can be a bastard to get those pulleys off. I used the old cam belt with a vice grip (Same as with the water pump pulley) to remove and fortunately I managed to get the bolt off without too much hassles. Now to pull the pulley off. Before going to get my pullers I thought I would try something quickly. I used the long extension on my socket set to gently tap the edge of the pulley – very lightly – Just ringing it and within a few taps the pulley jumped clean off!!! It has a tapered shaft. Sometimes you have to get lucky. Watch out the woodruff key could be loose. It was on mine.
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I then removed the rear part of the cam belt cover and the whole water pump was eventually exposed. The section of pump which is underneath the cover is circled in this pic.
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Now it was just a simple question of unbolting the waterpump and pulling it off.
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Before doing that I opened the drain cock under the radiator. Bottom left when facing the car and let the radiator and surge tank drain completely.
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Removing the water pump was a bit of a let-down after all the hassle getting there. Have a container ready to catch the coolant which will drain when you pull the pump off. Next I dried and cleaned the area where the pump attaches. Make sure the surface is completely dry and clean. I also removed the surge tank as I noticed a little bit of sediment at the bottom of the bottle. This was quickly cleaned with my pressure washer and thoroughly rinsed.

Here are some pics of the old pump the new one and the two piece design of the new one.
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Then I did a “dry” assembly to test if everything will fit. Here the water pump casing is in place and fits nicely.
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Once it was clean and dry I took the first gasket and lightly coated it with Victor Reinz RTV and placed in in position. Next the casing itself was lightly coated and then placed in position and lightly tightened with the nut and bolt at the extreme right. Then the pump gasket and pump in the same sequence and then I tightened the whole pump. I did not take pics as I was covered in sealant and didn't want the sealant to dry on the gaskets. New waterpump installed!
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Now speed is of the essence because you want to bolt the alternator bracket in place and tighten it so that the rear pump casing can be tightened there before the sealant dries too much.

The rest of the assembly is the reverse of disassembly! I always wanted to say that. :)

Some important issues to note.

It is advisable to lightly oil the bolt, washer and thread of the bolt securing the cam pulley as it is likely to bind making it impossible to get the correct torque value. I held the pulley with my vice patent so you do not want to struggle getting the correct torque and you REALLY don’t want that pulley to come off. Also don’t forget to refit the woodruff key before installing the pulley if you took it off.

On refitting the Cambelt.

When my cambelt and tensioner was replaced on 120000ks I kept the tensioner retaining pin.
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I just threw it in the centre console bin and it stayed there ever since. Take the tensioner and compress it in a bench vice. It looks like a small shock absorber. I used a small socket to bear against the piston/shaft whilst compressing it. Push it in very slowly and gently until the hole in the shaft aligns with the holes in the housing and insert the pin or a length of wire to keep the tensioner compressed. Sorry no pics. You are going to pull out the pin when the tensioner and pulley are all bolted in place and the cambelt is installed. Once everything is bolted in place fit the belt. The belt has two lines across the width of it that lines up with the mark on the cam pulley and the mark on the injector pump pulley. This is what the line looks like. I was surprised to note that it comes out much clearer on the pic than to the naked eye. Must have something to do with the flash.
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Over time these marks become hard to see. This is not crucial as long as the marks on the pulleys are all in place and the top span of the belt is tight. Make sure the belt is running in the same direction as before though (if you are not fitting a new one). If you can still see the lines it just makes it easier to ensure that the pulleys are lined up. Now pull out the pin and the tensioner will push up against the pulley and tighten the belt. Here is a pic of the tensioner assembly with the pin still in place.
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Again make sure all the timing marks are all still aligned after fitting the cam belt. You really do not want the valve timing to be out. Read EXPENSIVE into this. Once the belt is fitted turn the engine a little way clockwise and then back and check if the marks are still aligned. The bolt on the crank pulley has a 23mm head. I make this sound very difficult but it is really quite simple but I really do not want you to end up with bent valves.

I finished the whole assembly process and left the sealant to dry overnight. On Sunday morning I was going to fill and bleed the system only to discover that the idiotic f@#$*%g a$$holes at Toyota sold me 5 liters of pre-mix antifreeze while I asked for the concentrate. It was already in the plastic bag when they gave it to me and I didn't bother to check. I hate pre-mix as firstly I don’t know if the idiot on the other end actually mixed the premix 50%. Secondly I don’t want to pay a hell of a premium for their damn water. So today I first need to drive there all the way and beat the right stuff out of them and then I can fill and bleed the system this evening.

I hope you enjoyed this post so far.

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